“It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.”

C.S. Lewis

Staff Picks

Discover what our library staff have enjoyed reading recently.




The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks
I am currently reading The secret chord by Geraldine Brooks, nearly at the end. I have enjoyed some of this author’s other books and thought them good, and The secret chord is just as satisfying. She has King David portrayed in all his passions and faults through the narration of his prophet Natan, employing features of the story of the early kingship struggles recorded in the Hebrew Bible. 4 stars.
Genre: Historical fiction
Pace: Leisurely paced
Storyline: Character-driven; Nonlinear
Tone: Atmospheric
Writing Style: Descriptive; Engaginge; Lyrical; Richly detailed




The Lost Daughter by Elena Ferrante The Lost Daughter by Elena Ferrante
I recently finished The Lost Daughter by Elena Ferrante and will read more of her books. The Lost Daughter is a powerful, intimate exploration of a woman’s reactions to motherhood and general humanity. 5 stars
Genre: Domestic fiction
Location: Italy
Subject: Motherhood; Mothers and Daughters; Vacations






Country Women and the Colour Bar by Jennifer Jones Country Women and the Colour Bar: grassroots activism and the Country Women’s Association by Jennifer Jones
Country Women and the Colour Bar: grassroots activism and the Country Women’s Association by Jennifer Jones is a meticulously researched account of the commitment and effort of some individuals to found Aboriginal CWA groups or to facilitate inclusion of Aboriginal women in existing groups in a selection of country areas in NSW during the years when assimilation was the Australian government policy. This book is well worth reading if just for understanding the ground gained and lost in the reach for equality before the Freedom Ride bus made its impact. 4 stars.
Genre: Non-Fiction
Subject: Aboriginal Australians; Womens Social Reformers; Rural women




Forgotten War by Henry Reynolds Forgotten War by Henry Reynolds
Forgotten War by Henry Reynolds is an essential read in my view if you want to appreciate the breadth and depth of the conflicts in the period of the first 100 years of Anglo-European settlement of Australia. It opened my eyes to the great number of deaths incurred, comparable to the deaths of Australians in WW2, and the resistance on the part of Australia’s leaders and institutions to accord recognition of this war. 5 stars
Genre: Non-Fiction; History
Subjects: Aboriginal Australians; Australian Colonisation